Bridge Graduate, Coleen, Gives Us a Lesson on Teaching Parts of Speech

Bridge Graduate Coleen Monroe previously taught English in South Korea and Chile. She has since gone on to earn her Master’s in Linguistics from University College London, and is currently teaching English in Vietnam. As a seasoned teacher, we asked Coleen to again share her expertise– this time on how to teach part of speech. This post also appeared on her personal blog, Reverse Retrograde, about travel, TEFL, and more.  

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Teaching English Grammar with the Guided Discovery Approach

A BridgeEnglish teacher gives advice for teaching English grammar. She explains how to implement the “guided discovery approach.”

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“I Boring in this Class!” How to Teach Participial Adjectives

Picture yourself teaching a typical English language class when a student says, “teacher, I’m boring in this class!” You realize this could end in several ways; however, you choose the option of selective hearing and decide to forge on hoping the student doesn’t say it again more loudly. Despite the obvious mistake, if you teach English […]

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Yes, Drill Sergeant! How To Use EFL Practice Drills

Oral drills are a technique that we teach during the IDELT™ TEFL training course. Since oral drills can be difficult to set up and facilitate, we usually suggest teachers-in-training try to implement them later in the course after they become comfortable with the foundational classroom management techniques. Nevertheless, it is an important skill to develop. What is […]

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Trouble with Teaching Tenses: Teaching the Future

What would you English speakers say if I told you that you have no future?  It is true that the English language has no future tense, but there are quite a few structures that indicate possible future events. Joel may join us. Joel might join us. I think Joel will join us. Joel is going to join […]

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Order Word – Needs Who It?

This post was written by Rachel Spillane Is word order important in the ESL classroom? Do we need to teach our English students the grammar rules related to sentence structure – word order? Teachers, grammarians, linguists, high-school students and more importantly, the grammar-police (in various professions) have been arguing this for centuries. Do we teach rules or […]

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Behind the Scenes: Meet the Real-Life Grammar Advisor!

This post was written by Kaye McDaniel Grammar. For most ESL teachers, it is our worst enemy! Yes, teaching grammar is probably going to be one of the most difficult aspects of teaching English for you.  If you are a native speaker of English, you don’t have to worry as much as you think.  Even […]

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ESL: Teaching Tenses with Keywords

This post was written by Matthew Clark Are English verbs more difficult to learn or to teach? One way to make the process of teaching tenses easier is to highlight keywords that signal the use of a particular tense or aspect. For example, “I showered two days ago,” and “While I was walking the dog, it began […]

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Trouble with Tenses: Teaching EFL Students Simple Past and Past Progressive with Timelines

Timelines are a tried and true way to help EFL students conceptualize tense and aspect. The following is an example of how a timeline can be used to help students in the English classroom talk about the past. Come up with a list of life events. Start with birth, and move into adulthood, e.g. graduating, […]

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Trouble with Tenses: Teaching The Past Tense to EFL Students

As much as some of us try to forget our past, as English teachers we are confronted with it regularly. Teaching the past tense to EFL students can be challenging. Here is a suggestion to keep your lesson plans interesting: think about the last time you were interrogated by the police. Tell your EFL students that a […]

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